Back to Articles | « Previous | Next »
Home » Why the story of climate change needs you on World News Day

Why the story of climate change needs you on World News Day

Why the story of climate change needs you on World News Day

Today marks the fourth annual World News Day, a global campaign to support journalists and highlight the value of fact-based journalism in making the world a better place.

This year, World News Day focuses on journalism’s critical role in providing trustworthy information about an urgent issue that will define our lifetime – climate change.

Because Hong Kong is so prone to typhoons, covering climate change has become a natural imperative for the South China Morning Post. A history of covering typhoons has given SCMP a proclivity for reporting on weather disasters ever since this newspaper first put a front-page story on a typhoon’s devastation of the city in 1906.

Since then, the drastic changes in our climate has made it impossible for us to ignore the crisis that is escalating by the day. Ever since the Hong Kong Observatory started tracking meteorological data in 1884, the city’s weather pattern has experienced significant shifts.

In just under a century, the annual mean temperature in Hong Kong has risen by more than 2 degrees Celsius, which has seen rising sea levels and the number of “very hot days” reach a record of 47 last year.

The unprecedented weather and natural events of the past have signalled the significant impact of the climate on our lives and livelihoods, and the Post is committed to give the climate change crisis the attention it deserves.

As our understanding of climate change evolves, so has the new playbook for our reporting. Changes in the environment affect our world in countless ways, and we believe that having a robust interdisciplinary approach can bolster the quality, impact and trustworthiness of our coverage.

Establishing a team of journalists from a variety of backgrounds can synthesise and explain the latest climate stories and provide comprehensive fact-based coverage on this urgent topic.
Sticker