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Home » Picture this: Eye-opening images of what climate change has done and could do to our world

Picture this: Eye-opening images of what climate change has done and could do to our world

Picture this: Eye-opening images of what climate change has done and could do to our world

Some of the effects of a changing climate are noticeable. Some can be envisioned based on scientists' forecasts.

It’s a challenge for us to see our futures. Is it any wonder we have trouble seeing the future of the planet?

“The end of history” illusion says we can see significant changes of, say, the past 10 years, but we underestimate the changes of the next decade — like those of a 2018 U.N report that warned only sharp reductions in greenhouse gas emissions could stem more extreme weather by 2030.

"The climate math is brutally clear: While the world can't be healed within the next few years, it may be fatally wounded by negligence," said Hans Joachim Schellnhuber, founder and director emeritus of the Potsdam Climate Institute.

How do we see that future and be emboldened to urge government and business leaders to make steep cuts to global greenhouse gas emissions?

Some investors have sharpened their perspectives on their retirement needs with photos – digitally altered photos that age them by a couple of decades. The result: Those investors, on average, significantly upped their annual retirement savings.

Might that also help us in visualizing climate change and help us make better decisions?

Besides being an engineering marvel, Hoover Dam and Lake Mead are current-day signs of a warming climate, drought and chronic overuse in the West.

A nearly two-decade "megadrought" has driven the historic decline in Lake Mead. The lake's level has fallen more than 140 feet since its peak in 2000 and left shorelines with a growing “bathtub ring” of whitish minerals that mark its highest levels.

"It is a very stark contrast as you look at the lake and you see the high-water mark that was achieved back in the 90s and now see where the lake level is today," Bronson Mack, public information officer for the Southern Nevada Water Authority, told the Desert Sun in 2019.
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