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Home » OUR OLD CELLPHONES, COMPUTERS AND APPLIANCES ARE A BIGGER PROBLEM THAN EVER. HERE?S WHAT WE NEED TO DO.

OUR OLD CELLPHONES, COMPUTERS AND APPLIANCES ARE A BIGGER PROBLEM THAN EVER. HERE?S WHAT WE NEED TO DO.

OUR OLD CELLPHONES, COMPUTERS AND APPLIANCES ARE A BIGGER PROBLEM THAN EVER. HERE’S WHAT WE NEED TO DO.

Some things we’re glad to see grow: trees, children, our bank account balance, goodwill. But other things, not so much.

One of those “other things” is e-waste — outdated computers, broken cellphones, old appliances and other electronic castoffs of 21st-century life. According to the just-released Global E-waste Monitor 2020, last year people around the world generated 53.6 million metric tons (59.1 million tons) of e-waste — the equivalent of 9 million full-grown African elephants. That figure represents a 21% growth since 2014. The largest category of waste was small equipment, including microwaves, calculators, electronic toys and video cameras.

The report, an update on similar studies published in 2015 and 2017, was released July 2 by the Sustainable Cycles Programme, an initiative of the United Nations University, the U.N. Institute for Training and Research, the International Telecommunication Union, and the International Solid Waste Association. Interestingly, the e-waste generated in 2019 already exceeds the 52.2 million metric tons (57.5 million tons) the 2017 report projected for 2021.

According to the report, documented e-waste recycling also increased between 2014 and 2019, from 7.5 million metric tons (8.3 million tons) to 9.3 million metric tons (10.3 million tons). About 17.4% of the discards were known to be recycled last year, compared with 17% in 2014. “The recycling activities are not keeping pace with the global growth of e-waste,” the report says.
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